Participants

Residents

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Weldon Lodwick
Middle School: Falcon Bluffs Middle School
Discipline: Mathematics
Weldon Lodwick was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with dual citizenship (Brazil and US) and resided there until the middle of his 11th grade year. He then moved and graduated from Mount Lebanon High School (a suburb of Pittsburgh) in 1963. Weldon then went to Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio where he graduated from college in 1967 majoring in mathematics (honors) and minoring in physics and an emphasis in philosophy. He obtained his masters degree from University of Cincinnati in 1969. In 1973, Weldon began his Ph.D. program at Oregon State University. While at Oregon State University, besides teaching as a TA, he taught several semesters of beginning college mathematics at the maximum-security federal penitentiary in Salem and worked as a computer programmer for the Economic Research Service of the USDA branch in Corvallis. He left Oregon State University in 1977 to begin work at Michigan State University as a systems analyst for an international project for food production potential since his wife was getting her Ph.D. in sociology from MSU. In 1982, he was hired by the Department of Mathematics of the University of Colorado Denver where he is currently a Full (graduate) Professor of mathematics. One of Weldon's central themes of research is validation implemented by computers. When a computer returns a solution, how does one know (with mathematical certainty) whether or not the solution is valid? Another theme is uncertainty. How is it possible to explicitly model error and uncertainty in mathematical analyses? There are methods of interval analysis, probability, possibility theory, and simultaneous (fuzzy) set theory. Of these methods, those that he finds compelling are interval analysis and simultaneous set theory. Weldon's major interest outside of mathematics is in the study and practice of (universal) truths as they apply to him and compel him. Secondly, some of the issues that are a focus for him are those of peace, justice, compassion, and equity - world peace. He enjoys vegetable gardening, jogging, hiking, walking, racquetball, music (jazz, classical, blues, samba, choral, music with social content), poetry, photography, cooking, and drama. Now that his two sons are grown, he enjoys seeing them find their own way though life - their ups and downs. He enjoys participating in and observing life as it is played out, and of course, his granddaughter. Weldon's full bio, curriculum vita, and other information can be found on his home-page, URL: http://math.cudenver.edu/~wlodwick
Resident:
Elizabeth Untiedt
Lead Teacher:
Jennifer Swanson
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Steve Billups
Middle School: Englewood Leadership Academy
Discipline: Mathematics
Steve Billups is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver (UCD) with research interests in optimization and computational biology. He earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science and an M.S. degree in Mathematics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; an M.S. in Computer Science from Virginia Tech, and a B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science from George Mason University. While at UCD, Steve has served as director of the Center for Computational Biology, director of the Applied Mathematics Graduate program, and director of the Mathematics Clinic program - a distinctive program at UCD, which engages graduate and advanced undergraduate students in challenging applied research projects supported by industry sponsors. Steve owes much of his success in life to an extraordinary high school math teacher who turned him on to mathematics at a young age. So he is thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to Middle School and High School math and science education. From 2004-2006, Steve served as the research experiences coordinator for the DIMACS Bio-Math Connect Institute - a two week intensive summer workshop for high school math and science teachers, which focused on connecting mathematics and biology in high school education. Now, through the GK-12 program, Steve is very excited to be part of the team at Englewood Leadership Academy.
Resident:
Jeff Larson
Lead Teacher:
Ericka Legnard
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Larry Anderson
Middle School: Englewood Middle School
Discipline: Science, Chemistry
Professor Larry Anderson has been a faculty member in the Chemistry Department at UC Denver for over 25 years. During that time he has served as the primary research mentor for over 60 graduate students, and a number of undergraduate students. In addition to his work at UC Denver, he currently serves as a research mentor for three Ph.D. students at Taraz State University in Taraz, Kazakhstan (initiated as a Fulbright Senior Specialist, March 2008), and for several students, faculty and government officials through the Joint Graduate School for Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi in Bangkok, Thailand (as a Visiting Professor July 2004-March 2005 and June-November 2009). In 1999, Professor Anderson was awarded the Lyman A. Ripperton Award for distinguished achievement to an educator in a field of air pollution control from the international organization, the Air & Waste Management Association. It is awarded to an individual, who by precept and example has inspired students to achieve excellence in all their professional and social endeavors. It recognizes the abilities that only a few in the education profession possess -- to be able to teach with rigor, humor, humility, and pride.
Resident:
Katie Cofrin
Lead Teacher:
Scott Wallance
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Mike Jacobson
Middle School: Englewood Middle School
Discipline: Mathematics
Mike Jacobson is currently Professor & Chair of the Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at the University of Colorado Denver (UCD). He received his undergraduate training at the State University of New York @ Stony Brook completing his B.S. and secondary teaching certification in 1975. He completed his M.S. and Ph.D. at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977 and 1980 respectively, concentrating on Combinatorics and Graph Theory. From 1980 - 2003, he was a faculty member at the University of Louisville, attaining the rank of Professor in 1988, and serving as department chair for seven years, and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences for five years during his time in Louisville. While in Louisville, he worked on numerous projects with teachers in the Louisville area. In 2003, Dr. Jacobson was recruited to the University of Colorado Denver as Department Chair. He is presently co-pi with Doris Kimbrough and Carole Basile on the NSF funded "RM-MSMSP", where he has overseen the development and instruction of nine courses particular aimed at providing Middle School teachers with a challenging mathematical curriculum. In addition, he was co-pi on the Colorado Department of Education "Professional Learning Access in Science & Math through Internet Delivery" (PLASMID) with the intended purpose of developing on line versions of several of the RM-MSMSP courses for Middle School teachers in rural districts. Recently, he was awarded a $2.9M NSF funded GK12 "Transforming Experiences" grant to provide science and mathematics graduate students with the opportunity to become acquainted with K-12 education, with the primary purpose of increasing the number of Higher Education professionals able to work within the P-20 realm. In addition, he has over 130 published research publications, three edited volumes, actively supervises doctoral students in the mathematical sciences and has held research funding in the mathematical sciences with the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense and the Office of Naval Research.
Resident:
Craig Tennenhouse
Lead Teacher:
Miranda Price
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Timberley Roane
Middle School: Englewood Leadership Academy
Discipline: Science, Biology
Timberley Roane is an Associate Professor of Environmental Microbiology in the Department of Integrative Biology. Having received her Ph.D. in Environmental Microbiology in 1999 from the University of Arizona, Dr. Roane has established a research program in elucidating the microbial ecology and physiology of stressed environments, such as metal-contaminated systems. She also researches how biological stresses, e.g., microbial competition, influence the microbial ecology of human skin. Using conventional, molecular, analytical and biochemical approaches, Dr. Roane's research delves into the relatively unexplored world of environmental microorganisms and how our increased understanding of these fascinating organisms can be used to enhance our quality of life. Dr. Roane's commitment to science also includes a commitment to students, both in the laboratory and in the classroom. Her teaching and research programs involve active teaching and learning. Her goal is to help students prepare for and respond to the emerging needs in society through a better understanding of microbiology. Additional information about Dr. Roane and her program can be found at: http://thunder1.cudenver.edu/clas/biology/faculty/tRoane.html.
Resident:
Courtney Cage
Lead Teacher:
Suzanne Stark
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Mike Ferrara
Middle School: Creighton Middle School
Discipline: Mathematics
Mike Ferrara is an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at UCD. He received his BS in mathematics from Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken, NJ) in 2000 and his PhD in Mathematics from Emory University in 2005. After a 2-year postdoc at UCD, he was employed as an assistant professor at the University of Akron, in Akron OH, prior to returning to Denver this fall. His research area is graph theory and combinatorics, specifically extremal problems related to degree sequences and graph structures. He relishes collaborative research with colleagues and students, and can often be heard opining that "Mathematics is a team sport". Both in and out of the classroom, Mike enjoys spending time working with pre-college teachers at all levels. Prior to this year, along with Mike Jacobson and Erich Gott, he co-developed and team-taught "Discrete Math: Counting the Possibilities" - a discrete math course for middle school teachers offered through the RMMSMSP. While in Akron, he helped to redesign the curriculum for pre-service middle school math teachers, designed and taught the discrete math portion of UA's project AMP distance-learning workshop for in-service Middle- and High School Teachers and gave presentations to students and teacher groups in the Akron area. He is very excited to participate in the GK-12 program in this upcoming year.
Resident:
Breeann Tonnsen
Lead Teacher:
Peggy Rizzo
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Mike Greene
Middle School: Creighton Middle School
Discipline: Science, Biology
In my research I take a multidisciplinary approach towards understanding chemical communication in animals. The goals of my research are three-fold: 1) to understand the mechanisms by which semiochemicals, natural products that act as signals or cues, mediate animal physiology and behavior, 2) to characterize and identify the chemical structures of these semiochemicals along with factors regulating their production, and 3) to characterize the ecological, behavioral and social contexts under which they operate. The overlying purpose of this approach is to synthesize information about the structure and function of semiochemicals in order to gain a comprehensive view of animal chemical communication systems. To this end, my research operates at several levels of biological organization ranging from the biochemical to the ecological, although most of the work is organismal in nature. The bulk of my current research involves the investigation of how ants utilize chemical recognition cues in order to inform behavioral decisions. I am particularly interested in cues present in the mixture of surface lipids, including hydrocarbon molecules, which coat the surface of ants. Such cues can inform task decisions in harvester ants along with nestmate recognition and species recognition responses in other species. I currently have funding through USDA/CSREES/NRI to investigate nestmate recognition cues in the pavement ant (Tetramorium caespitum). I also work in collaboration with Dr. Deborah Gordon of Stanford University to investigate how task allocation is influenced by chemically-mediated interaction patterns among harvester ant workers.
Resident:
Nathan Frank
Lead Teacher:
Craig Walker
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Ron Rorrer
Middle School: Falcon Bluffs Middle School
Discipline: Science, Engineering & Physics
Ronald A. L. Rorrer, Ph.D., P.E., received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1984 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI & SU, now Va Tech), his M.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 1985 from VPI & SU, and his Ph.D. in 1991 in Mechanical Engineering from VPI & SU. From 1986 until 1987 he was a Precision Mechanical Design Engineering at Martin Marietta in Orlando Florida. He worked as an Advanced Technology Project Leader at The Gates Rubber Company in Denver, Colorado from 1993 to 1997, first in the Adhesives and Lubricant Group, then in the Advanced Materials Research Group. From 1994 to 1997, Ron was an Adjunct Professor in both the Division of Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines and the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado at Denver. In 1997 he became an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado at Denver. In 2004 he was promoted to Associate Professor of the newly merged University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. He has been a member of the advisory board for Metropolitan State College of Denver Mechanical Engineering Technology Program for 4 years. He has been the Faculty Advisor for the student section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for 8 years. He is also a CU-Denver faculty mentor on the Downtown Denver campus. He has published over 30 papers, written a textbook entitled "Engineering Design with Polymers and Composites," and has one patent. He writes articles for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers professional society magazine on hiring students and student transition to industry. For two summers he ran a program with Rich Sanders and Paul Musso of the College of Arts and Media, for high school students not on a college track, with courses on the Science of Musical Instruments and Musical Recording. This program was designed to show interest in topics such as music could be applied to a variety of careers that were beyond the initial specific interest.
Resident:
Matt Nabity
Lead Teacher:
Dan Steepleton
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